Posted by: fitartist | October 15, 2014

Petts Wood 10k, 2014

Remember this time last year, when I ran my first race in a long, long time, splashed through mud and puddles and came home with a great big smile on my face? Well, I enjoyed it so much I went back for more. The weather had been pretty much the same as last year, with lots of rain in the week and a good soaking through the night but, travelling over to the race, I knew I would just have to contend with some good muddy bits and a few tree roots this time. Thankfully the trains were running as normal and my journey was quite straightforward. Now, these 10.30 starts are a bit of a funny one and I was wondering if this might be contributing to my poor race experiences recently. For parkrun, I am up at my usual time, eating breakfast as normal and ready to get going for the 9am start, but when things are shifted back a bit, I’m thinking that maybe I need to introduce an extra drink along the way…more of this later.

Getting off the train, I started chatting to another lycra-clad woman, who was running the Petts Wood 10k for the first time, and we sauntered towards the playing fields with further running types. I could hear music as we approached, and there was a general buzz in the Petts Wood air, how lovely then to find that the music was live and the field was filled with happy faces and a feeling of excitement. There’s a real local feel to this event, with lots of families turning out to cheer people on and residents coming out into their gardens to encourage you around the course. Once I was registered and had fixed my number in place, we were soon taking our positions in the starting pens. Based on recent runs, I put myself in the 45-50 minute section and bobbed up and down on the spot to keep warm. After a once round the field, we headed out onto the road and towards the woods with cheers all the way.

Musical encouragement

Musical encouragement

Last year I had embraced the rain and simply had some fun, leaping over and into puddles, but today, as it was dry, I felt a little pressure to push harder, but wasn’t really feeling the push. It’s quite a narrow course in places, and you could find yourself stuck behind a slower runner, but people were very polite about it all (and as I felt like the slow one at times, I was glad of this!). The lovely people of Petts Wood Runners had positioned marshals throughout and had very thoughtfully pointed out tree roots and obstacles using a sprinkling of flour to catch your eye. I found the KM markers were appearing quite quickly, but was really slowed down by a long muddy hill around the 7k mark. Head down, I slogged my way up but, on reaching the top, had to duck to the side and subject those around me to a moment of hideousness as I almost threw up (what is going on?!). A few deep breaths and I was back in action.

There had been rumblings at the start that the band might reappear in the woods, so what joy to hear their jolly tones as I struggled through the trees, and they were so well placed, just before a sharp turn and one last hill. Smiling supporters and encouraging marshals pushed us onwards: ‘Just 2k to go!’ and the road felt good and steady after the uneven ground we had trodden until now. I looked at my watch and clung to the hope that I might go sub-50, but it wasn’t to be, and I rolled in after 53 minutes of determined discomfort. Compared with recent 10k times, this was a little disappointing, but I will remind myself that it’s a tough course, I wasn’t feeling great and, on looking at last year’s results, I took around seven minutes off my previous time!

On crossing the line, I was handed a medal, water, a banana and had the option of a samosa, which looked lovely, but…I collected my bag from the perfectly organised baggage area and instead bought myself a cup of tea and a piece of walnut loaf. Perfect.

Refuel

Refuel

Heading home, I felt ok and met the boys – who had been swimming – when I reached Lewisham. Hector was starving so we went in search of beans (it had to be beans) and ended up in Lewisham Wimpy (!). Everything was so much better all round after a bit of food and we did some shopping and headed home. This was where I started to feel unwell (again). I felt exhausted and my stomach wasn’t right. I was nauseous and weak, as if I’d run a marathon, not a 10k. So, what’s going wrong here? I made sure I ate well on Saturday and had plenty to drink, I had porridge for breakfast and again, had plenty to drink ahead of the race. I ate and drank straight after finishing and had lunch not long after, but still I felt awful. I have a ten mile race on Sunday, and don’t feel super confident right now! Any thoughts on why this is happening and what I can do?

Posted by: fitartist | October 6, 2014

Ride of the Falling Leaves 2014

My first sportive! As ever, I was pacing around the house twitching, so decided to get on my bike and head over to the Herne Hill Velodrome.

Ready to go

Ready to go

It was a bit nippy and, in my fingerless gloves, my finger tips got a bit cold. Good that the generous people of the Dulwich Paragon cycling club had very thoughtfully included tea/coffee/croissants and muffins the size of your head in the £20 entrance fee then.

In line for a warming cuppa

In line for a warming cuppa

It was clear straight away that the start of a cycle race is a very different place to the start of a running race (apart from the fact that it was most definitely as lycratastic as any running race I’ve attended). It was all very laid back, with riders rolling up, meeting friends, registering, grabbing some refreshments and heading out at their allotted times (I had been given the 9.40 slot but, as I was there stupidly early, I was pleased to find they were a bit more relaxed about this, and I was able to go at 9.10). I had my timing chip attached to my helmet and soon took to the velodrome for a quick once round before hitting the roads of south east London.

Onto the track

Onto the track

When I registered, I had the option of picking up a map, but it looked quite big and I felt reassured that there would be plenty of arrows (and riders) en route. As I rode along the road by myself, I momentarily regretted this decision, and hoped that I wouldn’t be adding extra miles to my course by meandering the wrong way, but I soon found myself riding alongside a Dulwich Paragon member, pedalling at a similar pace to me, and we chatted as we headed out of London and into Kent. I knew some of these roads from previous rides with friends, but was relieved every time I saw a blue arrow, and enjoyed riding with a few people every so often. There were whole stretches though where I was on my own, and I would occasionally wonder if I was going the right way, but would then be overtaken at speed by some whizzy rider and I would heave a little sigh of relief.

I knew from experience that this part of the world might throw some pretty serious hills at me, but I like a hill, and was in no way daunted, but some of those hills really did turn out to be *evil*! As is usual for me, I would grind steadily on the up and be swiftly overtaken on the down (I really must sort out that down thing), and soon enough, I was at the spot where you make your choice: 80k or 110k? I had already decided beforehand that it was 110 for me, no question about it, but it still made me smile to reach the fork in the road.

Long course please!

Long course please!

We really were spoilt with the most glorious weather, it couldn’t have been a nicer, more autumnal day. I wasn’t here to enjoy the views though, and really got my head down and pushed hard. It was interesting to see how it felt to ride – mostly – by myself over this distance, without friends stopping to take pictures, enjoy the view or even pause for delicious refreshments – it was good to push on, but sometimes a little break gives you something extra to tackle those hills. And my, the hills took some tackling. There were hills that I hadn’t met before, hills that have names that are known amongst the cycling community and hills that very politely announced themselves with a sign at the bottom: ‘Toys Hill’. Now, I have encountered this one before, but I think I went at it from the opposite direction, because this time it seemed all the more, erm, tremendous. Head down, I pushed on, looking up every so often to see how much more there was and how much steeper it was getting. Head back down. Look up. Head down. Brief flirt with an out-of-the-saddle moment. Bad move. Look up. And so on. And on. Oh, it went on. And on. But I got to the top, out of breath, heart pounding. It felt good.

Eventually, I saw signs for Westerham and felt a sense of relief at the thought of a fuel station and a chance to top up my water bottle. After the horror of feeling like I was dying after my duathlon the other week, I was absolutely determined to fuel this ride properly, with my jersey pockets stuffed with extra drinks mix, gels and a Jackoatbar (cut neatly into little bite-size chunks and wrapped in foil – I told you I was taking this seriously!). As I reached Westerham, I got distracted and overshot the turning, luckily realising I was on my own quite quickly, turning back and tracking down the arrow. Quite soon I found a gathering in the grounds of a church, huddled around a table full of water jugs, bananas and the most buttery and tasty flapjacks for that extra push up the last few hills towards London.

This next stretch offered some of the most stunning views, but also the roughest road surfaces and, of course, some equally rough hills. Even though my energy was flagging and my legs hurt (I actually did the ‘shut up legs’ thing), the thought of heading back to town gave me the boost I needed and I flew back with a smile on my face. I must say my smile faded slightly when I found myself unable to overtake some horse riders on a particularly stiff hill. One rider tried to chat to me, but all I could manage was a sharp ‘Can’t talk!’…

Some flat roads now, filled with traffic, and I met again with my co-rider from the early stages, to take on Anerley Hill, the last hill of our ride, towards Crystal Palace and our final stop in Dulwich. I got dropped at the traffic lights and took the last few residential roads and the odd little track to the finish line by myself. Here, I hopped off, handed in my chip and was given some little tags to claim my drink and pasta at the sports club.

At ease

At ease

If I had wanted, I could have had a pint of beer but, as always after a big effort, I craved a coke. How lovely to kick off my shoes and sit on the grass in the sun to enjoy a bit of refuelling.

Pasta party

Pasta party

Twenty-four hours on and I’m still buzzing, I totally loved it. I will be signing up again next year and aiming to beat my time of 5 hours 11 minutes. The organisation was excellent and I felt very well looked after. I think I might have found my new favourite sport – shhhh, don’t tell my running friends! ;)

Posted by: fitartist | October 3, 2014

Aldi Winter Running Gear in Store October 9th!

Yes, it’s that time of year again: the new Aldi Specialbuys Running Range is in store from October 9th. Earlier this year I tried out the Aldi Spring/Summer range and have worn it to death. I must say it’s really kept its shape and fit, even after hundreds of hot washes, and I still get complimented on the *bold* colours ;) This week I’ve been trying out some of the Autumn/Winter range and have found it to be just as good, and with some really lovely details that you just wouldn’t expect from a budget range.

Thumb-holes

Thumb-holes

I’m a big fan of the thumb-hole. Being small of stature, I have trouble finding long-sleeve tops that don’t swamp me, so it seems like tops with little thumb-holes were made just for me. So comforting on a cold morning run. Ah. This top has some other nice details such as well-positioned mesh and reflective strips…and all for just £9.99. If you like compression clothing, there is also a compression base layer set, at £9.99. You can also add to your winter kit with some long tights and cover up in hi-viz with a jacket for £19.99.

I’m quite particular about my running socks, preferring something thin that stops at the ankle, and the three-pack of trainer socks at £3.99 fit the bill perfectly – they’re a little bit padded, but not too much. Other handy bits and bobs that will make winter running that bit more cosy are the neck-warmer (in a very bright hi-viz, also great for cycling), and a headband that fits neatly over the ears (could also be worn under a cycle helmet). With regards to size, I would try on the headband if you can – I found it a bit big – and the clothing I find to be pretty much true to size (I go for a small, which it states on the label is 8-10).

There are other items in the range, including shoes, insoles, zip tops and a really nice hoodie, all from between £2.49 and £19.99. You can’t go wrong really can you? But get to your local store fast because they do go quickly!

Posted by: fitartist | September 25, 2014

Trail Running with Berghaus

It’s that time of year again, when I pull on my trail shoes and get good and muddy. For now I’m exploring new local routes (and looking forward to the Petts Wood 10k again – what a super muddy experience I had last year!). But, if you are travelling or exploring further afield, you might find these route recommendations useful. I would say the Moel Eilio route in North Wales is possibly the most beautiful, but then I might be a bit biased ;)

favourite uk trail runs infographic
Favourite UK Trail Runs Infographic

Posted by: fitartist | September 16, 2014

London Duathlon, I am a Duathlete!

I had a feeling the London Duathlon might be tough, but I hadn’t realised quite how tough. As always, I found the journey to the start almost as challenging as the event itself – I get so nervous about being there on time and, with the transporting of a bike added into the mix, I stress about everything that little bit more. As it turned out, it was an easy two train rides and a pleasant walk from Barnes station to the park.

There was a real buzz as we approached the park, but it was difficult at times to work out who was a duathlete and who was just out for a Sunday ride (I get the feeling there might have been some disgruntled cyclists who turned up to find their route closed). The event village was busy, with some of the ultra, sprint and super sprint competitors already out on the course. I could tell from my event pack that this was a very well organised affair, with wrist bands for transition, a number belt and a rather humongous timing chip strap to wrap around your ankle (we looked like we were on day release).

A number for everything

A number for everything

The transition area was closely monitored by marshals, who checked your wrist band and made sure everything else corresponded, and you were only allowed in once you had your helmet firmly fastened. The different distances had allocated areas, but you could rack your bike anywhere within this, so I chose sort of middle, since the run in and bike out were on opposite sides (I would say the signs for this need to be higher up, they were big, but were not really visible once the transition area filled up with bikes and people). Once I had racked up, I wandered through the event village to the loo (that nervous-going-to-the-loo-when-you-don’t-need-to thing) and noticed all the handy stalls around – you could even ask advice and get your bike checked over while you were there (I opted for a bit of extra air in my tyres, again, nerves).

Before I knew it I was herding into a start pen with the other Classic distance athletes and getting a little wave from Edward and Hector before we were set off in waves of about thirty people – this was excellent and so well done, with a little safety advice and pep-talk before the buzzer set you off. The first stretch was on bumpy grass, peppered with deer poo, but we were soon on a lovely smooth road, with cyclists coming at us in the opposite direction. At this point I felt good, I had been so eager to start and it was reassuring to know that everything was working properly. Not having undertaken a duathlon before, I wasn’t entirely sure how to pace myself, but I knew I couldn’t run a 10k PB with a 44k cycle and an additional 5k still to come, so aimed to keep to a 5 minute per km pace. The course was lovely, with lots of twists and turns – though one loop in particular felt like a loop too far – and I even had a magnificent stag strolling alongside me at one point. I kept to my pace and ran into transition after 50 minutes. I had started to feel a stitch in my side, but thought I would lose that on the ride. A quick change into cycle helmet, gloves, shoes and a gulp of my drink, and off I went.

It felt hard, my legs felt heavy and my breathing was laboured, but it was so good to be on the bike! My only previous experience of riding in a race situation was at the Crystal Palace Triathlon back in May and, as I knew so many other people there, this was a friendly affair with lots of ‘hello’s along the way. This felt different, with some really fast riders shouting ‘Right!’ as they overtook at speed, and a need to keep your wits about you if you planned to overtake yourself. I liked this :) It felt serious, speedy, and I found myself pushing harder as my legs got used to the new range of movement. The bike course was pretty hard really, with a quite steep climb, some fast descents and some really tight corners (I was rubbish here and simply had to slow to an almost stop and pump hard to get going again!). On the more exposed sections it was windy and I gripped tight to attempt to stay on course. This was my chance to take on some liquid and fuel, and I now know I should have been getting something inside me at regular intervals, but instead I had my head down, enjoying the ride. One of the best moments for me was going into the second lap. I spotted Edward and Hector sitting in the grass at the side of the road, holding up a colourful sign saying ‘Go Adele!’, with lots of cheers and waves, it really does give you a boost when you feel some support :)

The last lap of the ride went by in a flash, and I could feel some cramping in my calf muscles and a stitch-type ache in my side…keep going, keep going. There’s such a lovely sense of excitement as you turn off towards transition (all of the transitions were made really straightforward by clear signs and friendly direction from marshals), the sense of starting the next leg, getting going again on another adventure. This felt hard though. I jumped off my bike and hobbled in cycle shoes across the rough grass, my legs heavy and full of spin. Hanging my bike back up, I took a long drink, put on my running shoes and stumbled out to the run course, feeling slightly dazed.

*a little cheer from Hector, with Edward at his side, looking at the tracker on his phone*

I could see that I might make my goal of three hours if I ran a good time for this 5k, somewhere a little slower than I have been running recently, so not a problem. My legs were not hearing this though and before long I felt the cramp creeping up around my quads and decided to move over and stretch it out. Straight away my hamstrings seized up and I wished I hadn’t stopped…go, go, go! I hobbled on a bit further. Ahead of me I could see a drinks station and I thought maybe a few gulps of a sports drink might help, it did. Now, for the first time in a very long time, I found myself walking (‘To the next tree’), and slowly plodding along as best I could. I broke down the rest of the run, thinking ‘Just another fifteen minutes’, and saw people standing aside, also struck by cramp, doubled over and walking as if their knees were locked. Now, with just two kms to go, I tried to run again but my legs just couldn’t do it. A fellow runner asked if I needed a shoulder, saying he was hobbling too and another kind chap handed me an energy gel. I’m not entirely sure they work that quickly, but something did the trick and I ran those last two kms, with the finish in sight and the thought of a long drink to push me on.

Crossing the finish line (in 3 hours 4 minutes and 44 seconds) I took my medal and flopped down to have a little cry as Hector handed me a lovely medal he had made with ‘1st’ in silver sparkly stuff. The relief at finishing was overwhelming, it was so tough dealing with cramp and I quickly drank anything I could get my hands on and forced down two bananas before collecting my bike. Once again the organisation was excellent as my wrist band was cut off once they had checked I had the right bike, and off I went to enjoy a berry smoothie.

Two medals!

Two medals!

This was where I started to feel quite unwell. Not having taken on fuel at regular intervals, and then downing as much as I could stomach in a short space of time, I felt dreadful. Numerous trips to the portaloo, a lie down on the ground, and I felt able to start walking towards the station. We decided a stop at the park cafe might help and I watched the boys disappear into the distance as I bent over and publicly ‘shared’ my smoothie. Still, people were kind and a few asked if I needed help. On I went. It was decided that I should cycle to the station and the boys would catch me up, cycling seemed easier than walking at this point. At the station I bumped into my friend Roni, who had also been taking part in the Classic challenge, we exchanged stories of grit and determination and the colour started to gradually move back into my cheeks. In an attempt to get me back up and running and get some nutrients in my body, Edward suggested a big pub lunch…which really did the trick :)

Meat!

Meat!

You might think that someone who found themselves stopped by cramp, doubled over with stomach pain and vomiting into the grass would give such an event a wide berth, but I can’t wait until next year, I really want to do it again. This time I will work out a fuelling strategy (I have a year and other events to work this out – and any advice would be great) and I want to be able to give it my all right up to the finish line. And of course, my position of 12th woman in my age group needs to be beaten, top ten next time!

Entries are now open for next year, with early bird prices if you’re quick!

Posted by: fitartist | September 10, 2014

Summer Round-up and Duathlon Nerves

After a summer of lots of this:

Mine!

Mine!

and enough running, swimming and riding to fend off ice-cream belly (just), I need to get myself back into a routine and back in action for some autumn race fun. I had hoped to keep to my routine, but holidays, chickenpox (Hector, not me) and a lack of time meant things went a bit off-course. I did plenty of running on holiday, with sand-dunes and rocky paths to keep me on my toes, and even squeezed in a parkrun in Barnstaple…

Hero

Hero

I was delighted to discover that one of my heroes, Chrissie Wellington, was running at Barnstaple, so we made an extra special effort to get there (which involved a very rushed sprint along the river to find a footbridge as cheers rose up on the opposite bank – eek!). I also climbed elegantly into a wetsuit to make the most of the Devonshire sea…

Tight fit

Tight fit

Erm, I found the wetsuit excellent insulation against the roaring Atlantic, but I am at a loss as to how people jump in and out of these at a triathlon. More practice needed I think! So, many Adventures in Open Water Swimming took place in the North Sea, the Atlantic and also the Bude Sea Pool. Brrrr.

Now, of course, I’m back in action and getting my head down for some serious training. How lovely to be back at the running club, grinding up and down hills at Hilly Fields parkrun and also heading out solo for a brick session.

Quick change

Quick change

Because on Sunday, I will be gathering together a collection of running and cycling attire, my bike and various drinks and snacks and heading over to Richmond Park for the London Duathlon. I’m very, very excited and maybe a little bit nervous about this! 10k run, 44k ride and 5k run. Gulp. My session at the weekend really helped my confidence. I rode out into Kent (avoiding almost being crushed by idiot drivers on two occasions :( ), rode 42k, parked my bike in the hall at home and swapped to my running shoes to head out for a quick 5k. My legs felt surprisingly good at first, with a nice spin to them from the bike leg, but I soon started to feel a cramp setting in…I wonder how things will feel with an additional 10k in my legs this Sunday. There will be various distances being covered on the day, from Super Sprint right up to Ultra. Richmond Park is a great place to spend a day admiring the athletic prowess passing by, ahem. Watch this space next week for a full report on my own experience of my first duathlon.

Posted by: fitartist | August 7, 2014

Loxley Sports Kinesiology Tape

In the past year I have had some ‘knee trouble’, which the GP diagnosed as ‘runner’s knee’ after I told him I ‘run a bit’. I was then referred to a physio who worked on an imbalance in my glutes with various squats and physio-band exercises. Eventually things started to improve (thought the squats initially made things worse) and he suggested using a foam-roller to ease out the tightness in my ITB and now, whenever I feel a twinge, I get myself on the foam-roller and it seems to help loosen things out. Sorted. I do, however, have ‘an ankle thing’ going on. When I get up in the morning, my right ankle feels unstable, weak and a little painful to walk on – my first trip down the stairs always looks slightly comical. I have a feeling I am sleeping with my foot in an awkward position, causing my ligaments to stretch and create an imbalance. In an attempt to correct this, I have tried wearing compression socks to bed (too hot in this weather), I have tried wearing a support bandage (rubbish, partly because it’s a knee support, so doesn’t fit properly) and have had little improvement.

Kinesiology Tape

Kinesiology Tape

I was delighted then, to be asked to try out some rather colourful Kinesiology Tape. You will have seen these bright strips on the lithe limbs of the professionals as they tested their athletic prowess at the Commonwealth Games recently. This made me wonder if tape was something the recreational athlete would find useful but, having tried it out, I think it’s a great alternative to the bandage strips that often lose tension quite quickly and also move about during activity, lessening their efficacy. The tape can be used to support joints during activity, but can also promote recovery and reduce muscle soreness, and I see it can also help reduce cramp, something I have been having problems with recently. I notice also that the tape has a water-resistant coating, though I am yet to try it out in the pool. The tape does not contain latex and is also hypoallergenic – yes, I am one of those people who is left with a big, plaster-shaped red mark when I use some dressings :( The tape is easily applied and you can find instructions here (I am assured there will be illustrated instructions soon, to make application easier). You can see that some applications are easier than others and some, such as the back or shoulders, would require a second pair of hands to make sure you  get it right.

I am going to be testing the tape on my ankle over the next couple of weeks and will report back on any improvement. I might also try some post-activity taping to see how effective it is at easing soreness and cramp. In the meantime, you can check out the range of tapes and other products here.

Posted by: fitartist | August 4, 2014

Fast and Hard

This getting faster is really, really hard work. A few weeks ago I took part in the British 10k London Run and was absolutely delighted to sneak under the 50 minute mark and get myself a PB. It had felt hard, and I thought I ought to fit in another 10k race before my duathlon in September, so signed up for the British Heart Foundation Victoria Park 10k, which took place yesterday. We decided to head over there by bike and overground, so we could ride around and the boys could enjoy the park while I ran, unfortunately Hector picked up a puncture as we arrived in Haggerston, so I headed along the canal to Victoria Park while they tried to sort out the puncture :(

The atmosphere at the park was relaxed and friendly, with people milling around, collecting t-shirts, putting bags in the baggage area and taking selfies.

Chillin'

Chillin’

The junior race was started, then we were called over to join in the warm-up. Erm, I just swung my legs about at the edge and tried to look serious while people around me jumped around. We were then ushered into a very narrow funnel to face an arch that had ‘finish’ written on it. And we were off. This was a three lap race and very flat, with nice wide roads and paths to overtake the many walkers (yes, lots of people were walking. I did feel like calling cheerily ‘Give it a go!’ but didn’t have enough breath). I had really wanted to run under 50 minutes again and hoped to achieve a similar time to the other week, but I wasn’t feeling amazing and had to give myself little pep talks and work out how much longer it would take me to finish. My energy and enthusiasm was lifted when I saw Edward and Hector at the end of the first lap, smiling and waving: ‘I fixed my puncture Mum!’

The run was largely shaded by trees, but it did feel hot and my stomach was not feeling very happy, so it was push, push, push, head down and teeth gritted to get to the end. I had noticed that my Garmin was measuring short and, as I entered the finish funnel (as you did on each lap) I was confused about whether or not I had actually finished. Some runners had another lap to go and were heading left, spectators were blocking the way to the right and I walked right past the drinks and medals. I spoke to a marshal though and he kindly went to get a medal for me. When I pointed out that the course seemed short, he reassured me that they had measured it accurately with a wheel…

So, my official time is 46:42! This is getting silly!

I then got on my bike and headed over to the playground, where Hector had found something fun to entertain him:

Sand fun

Sand fun

The playground at Victoria Park really is great, even if you’re a bit bigger…

Post-race play

Post-race play

Posted by: fitartist | July 29, 2014

London Duathlon Brick Session

Only seven weeks to go! Seven weeks until my first duathlon! *I’m a bit excited*

I recently had the opportunity to try something new alongside the London Duathlon Ambassadors, ITU Duathlon Champion, Ryan Ostler and Junior Team GB silver medallist, Charlotte Harris: a brick session involving a thirty minute spin class followed by a 5k run, something that can easily be replicated in your weekly training. This did require me to get to central London after doing that child-care-relay thing then negotiating rush-hour transport and resulted in me arriving after the Q&A session, all hot, sweaty and a bit grumpy.

I was at least ready to go when I got there, all fired up and eager to put on some cycling shoes and clip-in to my bike. In the dark. This was a bit odd. This particular spin session was very different to any I’ve been to before, and I can see why it would appeal to lots of people, with its pumping music and club-like feel (low lights, enthusiastic instructor, motivational talk…). Personally I found it made me feel a bit old – I used to be addicted to spin, attending about four or five classes a week and coming out glowing, ready to take on the world, but right now I find myself a bit more serious and a bit less hands-in-the-air. The class was held at BOOM Cycle, which is ideally situated in the centre of Holborn, perfect for a post-work session to set you up for the evening. As I had arrived just as the class was due to start, I found myself at the back, just behind Charlotte Harris, so took the opportunity to check out her technique…as I thought, absolutely still in the upper body, with all the effort happening in the legs and glutes, must remember this on my next ride…

Charlotte and Ryan

Charlotte and Ryan

The class flew by, and we were soon glugging back some water and putting on some rather (large) fetching hi-viz tops to head out on our run. This leg of the brick session was led by personal trainer Mollie Millington (what a great name!) and saw us weaving our way as a group in and out of the evening drinkers and homeward-bound commuters of central London. This gave me a chance to chat to Kate Carter from the Guardian, who I met previously at a New Balance event at the London Marathon. I also chatted to Charlotte and asked her about how best to train for two runs and if she herself uses indoor cycling classes as part of her training. She told me that she does use these classes, but mostly in the winter and she prefers to use an endurance class, which is better suited to the kind of distances she is training for. She also told me that I should think about heading out for a run after I go cycling, this doesn’t have to be a long run, just a short round-the-block to get my legs used to the feeling of running off the bike. I’m definitely going to give this a try over the next few weeks because I am going to have to find something in my legs to see me through 5k after a 44k bike ride!

I can’t wait!

Brickies

Brickies

 

Posted by: fitartist | July 21, 2014

A Weekend of 100s

What a great weekend! On Saturday we celebrated our 100th Hilly Fields parkrun. It’s hard to believe that 100 runs have been and gone, it’s flown by! So that’s 300 times up The Hill!

The Hill in Lego :)

The Hill in Lego :)

We don’t have anyone who has run all 100, but we do have many of our regulars reaching their 50th parkrun and receiving their 50 t-shirt (I’m one of them, with just four runs to go until I reach 50, more celebrations!). On Saturday I headed up the hill with Hector and we helped to set up the course. We took some chunky chalk with us and set about writing some motivational messages on the downward slope that heads towards one of the hardest parts of our course. As we put cones out we heard rumbles of thunder, saw flashes of lightning and found ourselves sheltering from the rain under the trees as it poured down, washing away our chalk :( There is something magical that happens at parkrun though…at about 8.55 the clouds part and the sun comes out, or at least the rain stops long enough for people to run 5k! Once the runners had set off, I quickly re-wrote the chalk messages and cheered people on.

To the finish

To the finish

As people pushed on in the humid conditions, we gradually cheered runners across the finish line and were delighted to present a spot prize to our 100th runner Jez, who has been supporting us almost since the start. Jez is (sadly for us) heading off on an adventure with his family in the next few weeks, I wish Jez all the luck in the world and hope to see him crossing our finish line when he visits in the future.

100th finisher!

100th finisher!

As is usual at our celebrations, people were very generous in sharing their baking skills and we were able to offer a choice of truly delicious cakes.

Refuel

Refuel

One of the best things about being involved with parkrun has been the friends I have made. I love the feeling of community I now have in my area, stopping in the street to chat to people I hadn’t met before parkrun. This friendship now extends to meeting each other at running events, racing together and also enjoying our other shared interests. Yesterday I found myself spinning through the Kent countryside with Sally, Siggy and Stephen. We have been on long rides together before, and I wanted to make sure we fixed a date in our diary for another, which happened to coincide with a challenge on Strava, the Rapha Women’s 100k Challenge. This challenge aimed to encourage as many women as possible around the world to cycle 100km on Sunday July 20th, so we had to join in!

We met early and took the train to Hayes to cut out the grim bit at the beginning. We then pedalled hard, pushed up steep and steeper hills, whizzed down the other side, paused to enjoy the view and counted the kilometres as we went. Stephen had very kindly worked out a route which – amazingly – turned out to be spot on, he had included some pretty tough hills though, so it certainly wasn’t easy going! I love a hill and can happily zoom up them but, on a 100km ride, even I was starting to feel it. The wonderful thing about these rides is having time to chat and get to know each other better, getting to know each other’s strengths, supporting and encouraging and also the amazing things you see along the way (we were taken aback when we turned a corner and were greeted by fields covered in lavender in full bloom – the smell! – and were also somewhat surprised to see a field of rhea (they’re a bit like ostriches) fluffing their feathers and showing us their splendour). I’m not sure how I would manage on a solo ride of this distance, it certainly makes a difference having friends around you, and we pushed, cajoled and boosted each other on the way round until we arrived back home with a hefty time on our clocks (my longest ride ever!).

 

Hilly Fields on Tour

Hilly Fields on Tour

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 130 other followers