Posted by: fitartist | November 23, 2016

Get outside and fight the winter blues!

I’m finding it very, very tempting right now to ignore my planned sessions, being pulled back inside by the call of the sofa, a cosy blanket and a mug of steaming tea. I know though, that if I don’t get outside, get some fresh air and have a change of scenery, I could start to succumb to the winter blues. Some days it doesn’t feel like the sun will ever emerge…

Where's the park gone?!

Where’s the park gone?!

My strategy for coping with the colder, darker months is to get outside each day, rain or shine. I like to try and do this early on, so I don’t have a chance to talk myself out of it! A good way for me to fit it all in, is to do a ‘School Run Run’, which usually involves heading up and down some hills…

Hilly (Fields) Hills

Hilly (Fields) Hills

Two of my weekly runs happen in the evening, not my favourite time to run (I find it difficult to fuel evening activity) but, as I lead the GoodGym Lewisham group run on a Monday evening, I have to be there, perfect, no excuses! I can also guarantee that, after running with a friendly group, chatting as we go, then making sure everyone is engaged with the task, I come home feeling a warm glow and with a big smile on my face. My other evening run is on a Tuesday with my running club. Again, I have to be there to coach the girls’ group first of all, but I have been known to slope off before my own session starts (gasp!), but the pressure to stay is strong and this doesn’t happen very often. It seems sticking to a run is much easier if you ‘make an appointment’, put it in your diary and, even better, do it with friends – you won’t want to let them down.

Another weekly ‘appointment’ is at parkrun, either running or volunteering. I’m coming up to my 100th run and, if I stick to it over the next few weeks, it will coincide with our New Year’s Day run at Hilly Fields🙂 I hate missing my parkrun and it’s about way more than running 5k, if I miss the bit in the cafe afterwards, I feel very out of sorts! Sundays often involve some volunteering at junior parkrun, so encouraging little ones to take part and getting out in the park to blow the cobwebs away.

It doesn’t have to be an outside activity either, a brisk walk (or ride) to the swimming pool for a quick swim does the trick too – I started the week with a Monday morning swim and felt much better for it (it helped that there was only one other person in the lane though!). And, if you can’t get out to run/ride/swim, a walk will definitely do the trick. At half-term, we jumped on a train and had a day out at the beach and had it pretty much to ourselves. As you can see, the ever adventurous Hector is immune to the cold and took his body board, trunks and enthusiasm to make the most of what turned out to be a beautiful day.

Enjoying an October paddle

Enjoying an October paddle

What do you do to arm yourself against the pull of the sofa?

Posted by: fitartist | October 3, 2016

Shine Night Walk 2016, I did it!

Last weekend was pretty epic. On Saturday morning I was up bright and early (and it was bright, an absolutely beautiful day) to Swim Serpentine (I’ll post about this later in the week, it needs a space all of its own!) then, once I’d refuelled, recovered and fuelled up again, I was off out to take part in the Shine Night Walk. As I wrote about previously, I had initially signed up to walk the full marathon, but realised I would be unlikely to make a volunteering commitment the next morning, so went for the half-marathon option instead. I popped on my official Shine t-shirt, along with some quite, erm, eye-catching tights a friend gave me and headed off to Southwark Park.

Clown pants

Clown pants

The train was crammed full with people heading off out for the evening but, when I hit Surrey Quays, I discovered where the party really was! I was greeted by brightly-coloured marshals, pointing everyone in the right direction and found a park full of groups of friends and family, helping each other pin on numbers, adding fairy lights to rucksacks, fitting hairbands with LEDs and adding a splash of colour to faces with neon paint. There was a lovely buzz of excitement and anticipation as people got ready to walk.

Welcome!

Welcome!

I collected my rather cool flashing, lit-up wristband, prompted by seeing everyone else waving their arms in the air and headed over to meet #TeamSole in the backstage area. It very quickly went dark and the air became cooler (though conditions at this point were perfect) and crowds gathered to warm up and watch some short films, reminding us why we were doing this. The park looked so pretty, with lights twinkling and sparkling and a Mexican wave swept the first group out towards the start area and off out onto the streets of London.

Wave!

Wave!

A quick catch-up with my team, some final adjustments to my outfit, a last-minute sugar-boost with an orange Club biscuit and it was time to join in ourselves.

Is it Christmas?

Is it Christmas?

Now, I have run very many races (some with a bit of swimming and cycling added in for good measure), of varying distances, but I can’t recall having a done a walking ‘race’ since school, so I was unsure of what to expect and how to pace it. A very practical and motivating goal was to be able to catch the last train home (I know), so I estimated I would need to pace myself to finish in three hours. I take just under two hours to run a half-marathon, so this would take quite some brisk walking! There was a bubble of excitement as we headed out of the park, lots of chatter and a lot of strolling. The race is walked on open roads (apart from a short stretch outside the park), so you have to use your common sense and negotiate other pedestrians and obstacles. This is easier in some places than others of course and, it being Saturday night in London, became more challenging in the centre of town, where there was a fair bit of encouraging banter going on!

All that marching kept me lovely and warm and I found I really did need a bottle of water when I came to a fuel station (and the chocolate-covered biscuits were welcome too!). One of the things I enjoyed most about walking through London at night was seeing everything lit up (not just us walkers), with the London Eye being a rather warming shade of red.

Red eye!

Red eye!

With a few bridges traversed, we got to enjoy sweeping views of the Thames to boost our energy when we might be flagging.

River view

River view

My photos turned out to be quite blurry, due to the blistering pace I was going at, though I wasn’t at all bothered by blisters, wearing my Sole double layer socks (they’re lovely and toasty too, perfect for long walks). I found myself walking largely by myself, tagging on the tails of speedy walkers, who paved the way through the crowds, but never felt alone, dipping in and out of overheard conversations. The miles ticked down steadily, marked clearly by big signs and it wasn’t long before we made our way through the slightly maze-like Victoria (what is going on there?!) and took a turn towards the finish. Of course, there were still a few more miles to cover, but psychologically, this was a lovely turning point.

Landmarks caught my eye, Big Ben struck eleven (I had passed by earlier, when he was striking ten!) and I kept on keeping on. A walk across Westminster Bridge, the Saturday evening strollers along the Southbank to negotiate and the end really was in sight! By now, I had a feeling I wouldn’t make that last train, but this didn’t slow me down at all! I skipped along, eager to cross London Bridge and, when I did, I smiled as I saw a row of balloons bobbing at the edge of the river. Another friendly marshal (they were all so super and encouraging around the course) told me ‘Not long now! You’re so close!’ and I swept along, boosted by this touch of friendliness.

Nearly there!

Nearly there!

Turning a corner, I saw Monument ahead of me and leapt down a short hill to this sign:

13!

13!

Outside the Old Billingsgate Fish Market were crowds of supporters, a red carpet, a tunnel of twinkling lights and lots of music. I thought I had finished, so stopped to take some photos, then realised the finish line was actually inside! I passed through, hands in the air, looking around the vast space to see many walkers, now warming themselves back up with hot drinks, taking group photos and hugging family and friends. Such a friendly and supportive atmosphere! I was presented with my medal and soon heard a voice I recognised…

Bling!

Bling!

I turned around and saw a friend who lives nearby, a big hug and she introduced me to her team (they all work in an intensive care unit), telling me they have done this for years now, having also tackled the full marathon, check out all these medals!

Medal-tastic!

Medal-tastic!

It really does seem like people come back to this event year after year, loving the organisation, the support, the route, the atmosphere and the opportunity to raise money for a good cause, remember those who have been lost and, best of all, celebrate those who have overcome cancer and are maybe even taking part themselves. Entries are already open for next year, why not get a team together and start training now?!

Posted by: fitartist | September 28, 2016

Everyone Active – The Castle Centre

I’ve been enjoying making use of the recently reopened Castle Centre in Elephant and Castle, run by Everyone Active. It’s not my closest leisure centre, but is the nearest Everyone Active venue. My bike ride there takes me alongside leafy Peckham Rye and I ride through Burgess Park to the recently redesigned Elephant and Castle roundabout. This whole area seems to be undergoing a huge level of redevelopment, with flats popping up all over the place and an enticing-looking ‘Elephant Park’ being constructed. These changes are gradually bringing in chains such as Pret a Manger – just by The Castle – and the area feels very different!

Castle entrance

Castle entrance

The Castle is easy to spot as you cross the busy road, with its bright neon sign and contemporary style. The foyer is big and welcoming, with desks straight ahead, to join, book classes or pay your entry fee. A quick wander through the automatic gates and you enter an open area, with seating and a small soft-play area for younger children. From here, you can see the swimming pool and, upstairs, the gym and studios. Navigating the centre is easy, with big, clear signage and I found the changing areas clean and well-stocked with lockers (which take a returnable £1 coin).

Changing area

Changing area

So far, I have used the swimming pool, which I have always been lucky enough to find quiet, so didn’t have any problems negotiating a space for myself. I was very pleased to see a pool-side sauna and steam room, which are quite small, but new and clean and they get nice and hot, perfect after a swim or training session (I *love* a sauna!). There are plenty of showers, with two next to the pool, with adjustable settings, so you can get it really cold post-sauna, one of these showers has a seat and is accessible. There are also showers outside the changing rooms and private cubicles in the ladies changing area (I assume this is the same in the men’s) – the good thing about these is the shower adjustment, you can get it to the right temperature and switch it off when you’re ready, none of that having to press the button every few seconds!

As well as the pool, I have also used the gym. This is really well equipped, with two areas, both with the same cardio machines, so no need to queue. There are treadmills, stationary bikes, Nordic ski machines, rowers and step machines. There is also a great range of resistance training machines, with fixed weights and a really good free-weights area. In the free-weights area there are also kettle bells and weighted bags, a TRX and various other things I’ve never seen before! I decided I should book an induction, to make sure I made good use of everything and didn’t miss out! This was a group induction, so we were shown around the whole gym, looking at all of the equipment to see how it works (it’s all very simple and there is always a fitness instructor on hand to help if you need it). After the induction, I got stuck in, warming up on the rower and heading over to the free-weights. I didn’t find it intimidating and saw that there were actually more women than men in this space.

I am yet to try any classes, because they don’t really fit in with my schedule; it would be good to have more classes in the daytime, I’m sure they would be popular.

Studio

Studio

If you want to try The Castle, the opening hours are Monday–Friday: 06:30 – 22:00, Saturday: 07:00–18:00 and Sunday: 07:00–22:00. Check the prices here and the timetables here.

Posted by: fitartist | September 19, 2016

Paleo: 12 Weeks To Change Your Life by Rebecca Field

I have a cupboard full of recipe books and a quick flick through will reveal exactly which ones are the tried and tested favourites (well-thumbed, slightly stained pages)! I was interested then, to be offered an e-recipe book to try out. I do often search for recipes online, usually when I have a mish-mash of ingredients and I have no idea how to put them together to form an actual meal! This usually means a hurriedly scribbled list and some sketchy instructions on a scrap of paper, so I wasn’t sure how well I’d get on with an e-book; I enjoy sitting on the sofa with a ‘real’ book, marking pages that catch my eye.

We do have an iPad in the house, so this turns out to be the best platform for me, propped against the chopping boards, wedged behind the butter dish! The book is well-written and nicely laid out, with the usual lists of ‘store cupboard’ essentials, a good section on planning ahead, some words about the importance of exercise (of course!), all interspersed with case studies to inspire you to have a go (and keep going).

Cover

Cover

This is more than a recipe book. You will find sections on motivation, stress-reduction, the importance of sleep, ‘bad days’, nutrients, hunger, so basically a holistic approach to making changes to your diet (as it should be!). After reading the introduction, finding out what’s in and what’s out, working out a plan of action and thinking about incorporating exercise, you are presented with some helpful weekly meal plans. I find it so much easier to stick to a plan if I’m told exactly what to do! In an ideal world, we would, at this point, do a weekly shop based on these plans and make it all the more achievable to stay focused. Although there are foods that you have to avoid, there is a very positive focus on eating a nutrient-dense diet, offering a wide range of vitamins and minerals to make you feel fitter, stronger and more alert.

The Recipes!

Beautifully illustrated, with colourful, mouth-watering images of all the meals, the recipe section is clearly laid out, easy to follow and, best of all, uses small lists of easy-to-source ingredients (I am turned off by long lists and complicated methods, no thank you!). Breakfast includes lots of egg recipes, which is great since I am currently limited to a plain omelette or ropy-looking poached eggs!

Granola

Granola

Lunch offers lots of delicious salads, soups and broths, and ‘wraps’ (with the wrap element being lettuce leaves), all bursting with colour and nutrients. Dinner is a meaty affair, which is fine by me, but we do try to eat meat only a couple of times a week – it took quite a lot of scrolling to reach the fish section! There is an excellent salad and sides section, with some tasty dips and sauces and lots of vegetable dishes to make into a main, or to accompany an earlier recipe as a side.

Grilled fresh trout

Grilled fresh trout

Quite often when I look at ‘healthy’ recipe books, the puddings are either overlooked or disappointingly dull, but this book offers a selection of fruity treats, such as Raspberry Ice Cream, using coconut milk (it looks yummy!) and one I might try this weekend, since we have lots of plums, Roast Plums with Star Anise and Cashew Nut Cream. Included also are snacks, smoothies and juices, so plenty (200 recipes!) to keep you focused on eating an array of foods across the week.

Try this at home!

Just like the picture in the book...sort of!

Just like the picture in the book…sort of!

This week I gave one of the recipes a try. It happened to be a day when Hector had a friend around after school, so I wondered if I was risking it trying something new with potentially fussy eaters! The Persian Chicken Kebabs are so incredibly easy to make though and, as I was mixing the marinade (garlic, pepper, ground coriander, turmeric, ground ginger and lemon juice) the boys looked on, Hector’s friend commenting ‘I don’t like ginger. I don’t like lemon juice. I don’t like chicken’. It was a different matter though, when I presented them with tasty skewers, piled on a mixed salad and they tucked in, telling me that they did ‘indeed like the chicken!’ Result! I do find it hard sometimes to work anything a bit different into our diet, but the recipes here can easily fit in with family life, with enough to choose from to please the choosy amongst us!

Posted by: fitartist | September 14, 2016

Run, row, ride! Join a new virtual event!

I have been logging my activity for a few years now, keeping track of my running/swimming/cycling to have a record of how far and how fast (or slow!) I have been going. It’s really good to look back and see what has worked, which activities have challenged me most and to get a sense of how I am progressing. I do sometimes wonder how far I have gone over the years, imagining where I could have got to in that time. I was very interested then, to have the chance to try out this new virtual challenge, that allows you to set a goal, either individually, or as a team.

Team work

Team work

My Virtual Mission allows you to see exactly how far your running/cycling/swimming/rowing, and so on, have got you. You can join an existing mission, such as the one I joined, that aims to travel from Land’s End to John O’ Groats, or you can set up your own (I’m seeing how long it takes me to swim the English Channel!). It’s a really fun way to convert what could be quite dull statistics into something a bit more interesting, giving a goal and also a sense of achievement when you reach your (virtual) destination.

Land's End

Land’s End

It’s really easy to get started (read more about this here) and you can even set up your challenge as a fundraiser for your chosen charity, giving even more motivation to keep going. Once you set up your mission, you just go out and exercise, as usual and upload your data automatically via a connection to Strava, for example, or by using the mobile app. Easy!

Keep going!

Keep going!

The event starts on October 1st and you can select your own time-frame in which to complete your mission. Why not get set up now, ready to get stuck in when October rolls around? To get £5 off your registration, enter ‘5off’ at the checkout. See you in John O’ Groats!

Posted by: fitartist | September 14, 2016

Shine Night Walk 2016

I quite often get asked by running friends to join them on 24-hour night-time challenges. I always politely decline, saying how much I need my sleep. I’m not quite sure then, why I’m going anywhere near this upcoming night-time event! I had initially signed up to the full marathon Shine Night Walk, but realised I would need to step back to the half-marathon option if I was to make a volunteering commitment on the Sunday morning – oops! So why did I agree to take part? The Shine Night Walk is Cancer Research UK‘s night-time marathon, to bring people together and to raise much-needed money to fund research into cancers that affect people around us every day. There will be people raising thousands of pounds and also walking to raise awareness, to remember loved ones and to celebrate those who are living with cancer.

I consider myself to be pretty fit, having taken part in a few endurance events in the past few months and having covered the half-marathon (and marathon) distance numerous times now. I do realise though, that I shouldn’t be complacent and imagine that this will be a walk in the park (or city, to be precise – see the course map here), so will be doing a bit more walking in the next couple of weeks, to gear myself up for the challenge. I have been given some very nice Sole dual-layer socks to wear and some footbeds to help me float on air around central London. I have no idea how long it will take me to complete the half-marathon distance, but I will look forward to cooling my feet and letting them breathe the next day, in my lovely, comfy flip-flops.

I think the course is well-stocked with aid stations, with loos and fuel, so I shouldn’t have to carry too much, but I do need to get myself fully lit-up, with face paint, glow-sticks and LED lights, well I do want to shine for the occasion!

Posted by: fitartist | September 12, 2016

London Duathlon…not long now!

Oh my, this always comes round very quickly! Only a few days until I throw myself wholeheartedly into this year’s London Duathlon. It will be my third time in Richmond Park for this brilliant annual event. You can read about my two previous ‘attempts’ here and here. The first year I really struggled with cramp, I hobbled my way to the finish, where I promptly threw up. This led me to embark on an ongoing exploration of how to deal with cramp and dehydration, trying all sorts of fuelling strategies to get to the bottom of why I had such a difficult time. In the second year I had had a nasty chest infection in the lead up to the race, so went into it feeling a bit rough and not particularly confident! Both times I was over three hours finishing and would dearly love to smash that three hour mark this time.

Got my number!

Got my number!

How will this race be different? I haven’t done a great deal of road cycling (one long ride with friends and, of course, my half-ironman back in July, oh and Ride 100!), but have been on the turbo-trainer and to spin classes *a lot*! I really enjoy the bike leg in any multi-sport race, I look forward to it during the swim (or run 1) and look back longingly at cyclists when on the final run leg. My running, as always, is plodding along, but there’s a bit too much emphasis on the plod right now, I can’t see myself running the 10k and 5k run legs any faster than previously this Sunday😦 I do think, however, that I might just have got on top of the cramp and dehydration problems that have caused so much discomfort and distress in the past.

What have I done that might make a difference? I have learned to drink whilst on the bike. Now this might sound totally daft to anyone who cycles long distances regularly, but there really is a skill to drinking on the move – it can be quite tricky reaching down to grab your bottle from its cage, sipping whilst steering and looking where you’re going and then getting the bottle back in the cage…all in one swift, smooth move. Well, that’s now mastered, but there’s also the actual *remembering* to drink. Yes, I know! I finish the first run (or the swim), jump on my bike, get caught up in the excitement of it all (quite often going ‘weeeeeeee!’ down the hills) and simply forget to take a drink. This was what happened on that first London Duathlon and I paid the price horribly, swearing never to let that happen again. I have also been taking magnesium supplements, having read that they can help with muscle recovery and also with cramping. I fill my drinks bottle with Precision Hydration tablets (which I first found at the triathlon show at the Olympic Velopark earlier this year), making sure I have the right level of electrolytes going back in (I sweat heavily on the move) and I even took some salt tablets during my half-ironman (I’ll try anything!). Let’s see if all this gets me through Sunday’s duathlon in one bouncy, not wobbly, piece!

Watch this space!

Posted by: fitartist | August 26, 2016

South Coast Path Run

I like listening to the Marathon Talk podcast. I think the idea is that you listen to it on your long run, but I go ‘pah!’ to that and listen to it on the turbo trainer, get me! I was very inspired by Martin Yelling’s Long Run Home and did a little dance when I realised that it would coincide with our trip to Cornwall. Martin’s goal was epic: to raise money for three charities by running 630 miles over 21 days. This in itself is an incredible challenge, but the path is rough, narrow in places and very, very hilly. I followed Martin’s progress before we set off towards Fowey and looked on as he battled the heat, the rain, the terrain and the subsequent pain.

We were due to arrive in Cornwall the day he ran the section nearest where we were staying, so I planned to head over to the next stage on the Sunday morning. Sadly, Martin succumbed to injury and took an enforced ‘rest’ day that day. I had really looked forward to this run, so decided to cover the ten miles I had planned near our house, so Fowey out towards the west and back. It was stunning, but I soon appreciated what Martin must have been going through in the days before. First up, I found myself in a field of maize (it’s easy right? You just go along the edge of the sea and you can’t get lost?!).

Maize maze

Maize maze

Picking my way through, I was soon on a romantically named road and back in the right direction…

Love

Love

At this point it was raining and I went thump on my bum, with a loud ‘oof!’, yes, this path is really, really challenging! The thing about this kind of running is that you are so focused on the path ahead and keeping your footing, that you almost forget to look up and enjoy the view (perfect excuse to pause and get your breath back).

The view

The view

There were steep hills to conquer, with interesting structures to aim towards…

Look-out

Look-out

There were steps to scramble (imagine doing this in a 20 mile+ day, never mind on a leisurely 10-miler!).

Steep!

Steep!

I didn’t see many people, but those I did see gave me a jolly ‘Good morning!’ and one chap, who was CYCLING along the path (!), stopped to have a chat. This was not London. Every so often, I would find myself in a cove, just me and the water lapping around me. This one was the inspiration for Daphne de Maurier’s ‘Rebecca’, giving it an eerie and romantic air.

Menabilly

Menabilly

As I went on, the weather changed and I was getting gradually wetter and wetter, but this felt lovely. The air smelt delicious, the cows lapped up the grass and the structures I had seen on my outward journey slowly disappeared…

Nearly.

Nearly.

I returned to the house, where people had eventually emerged from their bedrooms, feeling refreshed, invigorated and recharged. Martin went on to complete a few more legs of his run, helped along the way by runners who, like me, had wanted to share the experience. His injury put his own running on hold and others took charge of the tracker, to complete the Long Run Home, reaching his fundraising goal along the way. After a few more runs along this path, my ankles ached, my glutes ached and my cheeks ached from all the smiling. Holiday running is just wonderful!

Posted by: fitartist | August 25, 2016

Ion8 Sports Water Bottle – No Leaks!

At last, a drinks bottle that doesn’t leak!! I had been complaining about constantly ending up with wet stuff in my bag (and even getting a wet back one day), after going through a series of water bottles that promised to be leak-free, only to find they clearly weren’t. Thankfully Cathy at JogBlog saw my plea for recommendations and forwarded me details of a bottle that looked like it would do the trick.

I was a bit cynical when I was sent the Ion8 Sports Water Bottle to test and carefully propped it upright in my kit bag, worrying that my books and notes might end up soggy by the end of my journey. The number of bottles I’ve been through is getting into double figures, as they work brilliantly for a few days, then start to leak everywhere without fail. I’ve tried pop-up tops, twisty tops, screw tops and flip tops and now have a cupboard full of them. This bottle is different though and uses a combination of a removable lid, with a button and a clasp, double locking!

Watertight

No leaks!

I’ve tested the bottle thoroughly, with a family holiday in Cornwall, so it’s been on trains, to the beach and upside down in my rucksack…and it really hasn’t leaked! After almost giving up on ever being fully hydrated on journeys, this is a revelation! It comes in three colours (I have the pink and feel like some sort of water-drinking professional when I get it out on the tube) and has a nice rubber grip. This is what the manufacturers have to say about the bottle:

‘When closed, hypoallergenic silicon seals the spout and vent completely, and keeping it sealed, clean and hygienic. The bottle can be opened with one hand by using its spring loaded flip top. To prevent accidental opening when carrying in a bag, ion8 has a lid lock. While many rigid bottles are painfully slow to drink from, the ion8 has a vented, smooth liquid flow, providing effortless hydration. There is no annoying screw top and no tough nozzle.

A wide opening also allows refilling without spillage, and is big enough for ice cubes or even chunks of fruit for a healthy, subtle hint of flavour.’

It’s also free from nasties:

‘Ion8 is made from BPA Free, phthalate free, non-toxic TRITAN by Eastman. Tritan® is highly resistant to odours, can be easily cleaned and is dishwasher safe.’

Ooh, I didn’t know that about the dishwasher, great (I was avoiding putting plastic bottles in the dishwasher, having melted one previously).

If you fancy having something reliable and nice to use, then I’d recommend the Ion8, I’m now a non-leaky believer😉

Posted by: fitartist | August 10, 2016

The Primal Pantry Paleo Protein Bars

Yum!

I’ve tried bars from The Primal Pantry range before and really enjoyed them. I find them quite satisfying and filling, which is unusual because I often find myself reaching for the ‘snack box’ not long after eating the usual cereal bars. I was happy to be sent some of these to taste test and put them to very good use in the past few weeks, with my various epic events that needed both fuelling and refuelling (more on that in another post).

Paleo Bars

Paleo Bars

These two new protein bars in the range claim to be the ‘cleanest’ bars around (meaning they are made without any additives, preservatives, flavourings or colourants); they are also grain free, dairy free and gluten free. Even so, they are not short on flavour! I would say, having tried the other bars by The Primal Pantry, these are the tastiest yet, with the Cocoa Orange being a personal favourite, so orangey! I am hoping they might bring out a mint-choc flavour, now that would be delicious!

When should you use this bar in your training? I would say this is great post-activity, with both protein and carbohydrates to aid recovery. I have also used the bars (cut into neat little bite-size chunks) on a long bike ride though, finding they give a great energy-boost (and they gave me something to look forward to!). Try them for yourself, from health food shops and larger supermarkets, for £1.99.

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